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20130201
20130228
STATION
KQED (PBS) 24
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 2:30pm PST
of antigovernment protesters have renewed their marches in cairo and other cities. they've there have been a number of clashes with security forces who have been firing tear gas and water canners. but after more than a week of unrest, president morsi has issued a statement saying those behind the violence will be held politically accountability -- accountable. >> flashes on the doorstep of the presidential palace. the fires from the cocktails thrown, a message to muhammad morsi. the people feel betrayed. the revolution was supposed to turn egypt into a country where everyone prospered. and where there was justice. for these people who gathered earlier in their new regular friday rituals, reform is coming far too slowly. >> we're back to another demonstration in tahrir square. of course piece people feel passionately about wanting to change things. there are many, many egyptians who feel demonstrations like this are counterproductive and need to stop. ahmed is one of those who feel that after so many decades of dictatorship, the new president needs more time to fix things. >> right nouts not the rig
PBS
Feb 17, 2013 5:00pm PST
at exorbitant rates -- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousness by getting this bill passed in the coming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the system, you elect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transforma
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 6:00pm PST
, and schools closed in a number of cities. forecasters predicted new england would get the worst of it with up to three feet of snow likely in boston. mayor thomas menino. >> this is a storm of major proportions. stay off the roads. stay home. let the public works crews do their job. >> brown: the region also braced for winds reaching 75 miles an hour that will pile up drifts and almost guarantee widespread power outages. as ever, the threat prompted shoppers to pack stores, stocking up on supplies. >> this is panic shopping, so bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> you've got to plan ahead. a couple feet of snow would shut everything down and, who knows, it could be a couple of days, right? >> brown: in new york city, predictions called for as much as a foot of snow, and mayor michael bloomberg said the city had marshaled an army of plows and salt trucks. >> the sanitation department will deploy something like 1,700 snowplows and 65 front-end loaders. it also has 450 salt-spreaders already deployed. >> brown: the storm also focused new concern on the new york and new j
PBS
Feb 15, 2013 3:00pm PST
for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this g
PBS
Feb 10, 2013 5:00pm PST
city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the electrification story from the beginning of the 20th century. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america to have the dignity and self-respect and sort of cultural and social and economic connection of an electrical outlet in their home. so he made sure to take on the special interests that were controlling elec
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 7:00pm PST
: in new york city and elsewhere, preparations are being made for clean-up. >> we have more than 250,000 tons of salt on hand. >> reporter: according to the long island power authority, the storm has the potential to cause power outages for 100,000 customers on long island. and for the first time ever, lipa is deferring storm operations and response to its subcontractor, national grid. but in manhattan today, it was mostly business as usual, although many workers did try to leave early to beat the snow. and if the snowfall is anywhere close to the storm of '78, you'll see the impact in economic data in the weeks ahead. >> usually major storms cause increased volatility in economic data. so, that jobless claims jump significantly in the beginning as government offices close, because of the storm. and they surge back up after the offices reopened. >> reporter: if there's a silver lining in this storm, it's the timing. the heaviest snowfall will happen over the weekend. and the clean-up is expected well before valentines day, which contributes $18 billion to the economy. erika miller,
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore who died at age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication to her he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it.
PBS
Feb 19, 2013 12:00am PST
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate over school reform. she has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, i cut a central office bureaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's doing all these co
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 12:00am PST
when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of state from 1997 to 2001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown an
PBS
Feb 9, 2013 12:00am PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the united states constitution is over 225 years old. though our nation has transformed since the document was ratified, this text has remained largely unchanged. some scholars question relevance of the constitution in the modern day, others insist we must strictly adhere to the words of our founders, akhil amar suggests that we look beyond the text. he is the sterling professor at yale law school and a constitutional law scholar. his new book is called america's unwritten constitution, the precedence and principleses we live by. i am pleased to have him at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> so what about this love affair with the constitution that you have, did it come from undergraduate z it come from law school, did it come from some sense of america and its -- >> it came from the day that i was born and because the day i'm born in ann arbor, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first se
PBS
Feb 19, 2013 10:00pm PST
, in my opinion, came from new york city, or the suburbs of new york city, or any urban environment, and they're not used to what goes on in newtown, or what has been going on. and then you get that conflict. it's just, you know, growing pains in a situation like this. >> each of these red dots represents a home from which a complaint was lodged with the police about the sound of gunfire near these homes. i think this was 2010 to the first part of 2012. 85 noise complaints related to shooting, spread pretty broadly throughout the town. so last year the town decided to do something about it. joel, how are you? >> nice to see you. come in. >> thanks. >> i think it had just reached sort of a critical mass of a number of complaints. so we set this ordinance up, and it would say, "look, you cannot shoot a gun in newtown unless you're doing legitimate hunting, or you have a legitimate shooting range." >> did this feel like controversial legislation ordinance to you? as you were drafting it, did you think... >> not in the least. absolutely not in the least. i never expected that there woul
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)